ESPN Apologizes for Holding Fantasy Football Auction that ‘Resembled a Slave Auction’ According to Some

A segment aired on ESPN Tuesday depicting a fantasy football auction using staged images of NFL football players. Many of the players happened to be black and most of the bidders happened to be white. This harmless coincidence led to people believing the auction resembled a slave auction. Yet another example of ultra-sensitive busy bodies desperately searching for something to be offended by.

Via Breitbart:

Leading some to say the scene resembled a slave auction. The network has since apologized for the segment, saying they understand how some could believe that the scene too closely resembled a slave auction.
In a statement to The Big Lead, ESPN said, “Auction drafts are a common part of fantasy football, and ESPN’s segments replicated an auction draft with a diverse slate of top professional football players. Without that context, we understand the optics could be portrayed as offensive, and we apologize.”

Super liberal ESPN can’t even keep up with what is considered offensive these days. Those who inserted a racial context into the harmless fantasy football sketch are race-baiting drama queens. One would have to be completely insane to compare fantasy football to slavery, yet ESPN took this seriously and were shamed into apologizing for it.

Via The Big Lead:

Would this sketch even be an issue if the auctioneer had chosen Tom Brady as the player to auction? Of course not. It was going to be a star and maybe we have a Giants fan making the call instead of a Patriots fan. It’s unlikely there was anything racial about the choice.

The more troublesome thing here is that the crowd was overwhelmingly white and no African-American men can be seen representing a group that they are part of–fantasy football and football fans. This group appears to be a group of ESPN employees likely drawn into the scene as “extras.” The exclusion, I would highly doubt, was anything approaching intentional. ESPN probably gets too much criticism for the diversity of its on-air talent. For this limited group of ESPN’ers, that diversity did not extend when they went on air. But that’s an issue far beyond this one skit.

 

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