Guns Used to Kill Brother of Former Chihuahua State Attorney Linked to Operation Fast and Furious

By: Rachel Pulaski

On December 14, 2010, Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was shot dead by a group of suspected drug cartel along the Mexican border in Peck Canyon, northwest of Nogales, Arizona. The guns used to kill Brian Terry were traced back to Operation Fast and Furious. In September 2011 the Attorney General of Mexico confirmed 200 murders happened in Mexico as a direct result of Operation Fast and Furious.

Now another murder connected to Operation Fast and Furious has surfaced. According to a congressional report released, Mario González Rodríguez, brother of the state attorney general of Chihuahua at the time, was also murdered by guns traced back to Operation Fast and Furious. The U.S. withheld this information from Mexican authorities for eight months.  

The video shows Mario González Rodríguez handcuffed and surrounded by masked men holding guns.

The El Paso Times reported:

“On October 21, 2010, drug cartel members kidnapped Mario González Rodríguez from his office,” according to the 2011 congressional report. “At the time of the kidnapping, his sister Patricia González Rodríguez was the attorney general of the state of Chihuahua.”

Mexican officials said Patricia González Rodríguez was already on her way out because the new governor had been installed and a new state prosecutor was going to be appointed.

“A few days after the kidnapping,” the congressional report said,” a video surfaced on the Internet in which Mario González Rodríguez sat handcuffed, surrounded by five heavily armed men wearing masks, dressed in camouflage and bullet-proof vest.”

“Apparently, under duress,” the report said, “(González Rodríguez) alleged that his sister had ordered killings at the behest of the Juárez cartel … the video quickly went viral.”

Chihuahua state Attorney General Patricia González Rodríguez denied the allegations of drug corruption and traveled to Mexico City to seek the federal government’s help in investigating her brother’s murder. She is no longer in Chihuahua, and reportedly left Mexico for safety reasons.

A video of Mario González Rodríguez’s “interrogation” by armed men was carried on YouTube. The body of the well-known Chihuahua City lawyer was found Nov. 5, 2010, in a shallow grave.

Then, Mexican federal authorities, following a shootout with drug cartel suspects, seized 16 weapons and arrested eight men in connection with Mario González Rodríguez’s murder.

Mexican officials submitted information about the weapons to the ATF’s e-trace system, and the ATF traced two AK-47s to Operation Fast and Furious.

The congressional report said that an ATF email indicated that ATF officials in Phoenix who knew the two assault rifles came from the controversial operation withheld the information from Mexican officials until June 2011.

These deaths are a direct result of the DOJ’s attempt to suppress second amendment rights by using Fast and Furious documents to push more gun regulations on the great citizens of this country.  We should certainly give Attorney General Eric Holder the credit he says he deserves for Operation Fast and Furious.

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