85-Year-Old Long Time Salvation Army Bell Ringer Banned From Fundraising Outside Nordstrom

An 85-year-old man who has raised over $100,000 for the Salvation Army has been banned from collecting donations outside a Seattle Nordstrom.

The ban comes amid outcry from the left that the Salvation Army isn’t pro-LGBT enough.

Dick Clarke had been collecting donations outside the store for 18 years without any problems. This year, however, the retired teacher and principal was met with absolute grinches.

“The best thing I like about Thanksgiving is the next day I go to work,” Clarke said of his efforts to give back.

Instead of supporting his noble efforts, Nordstrom informed Clarke that he would no longer be allowed to fundraise by their doors.

“Nordstrom spokeswoman Jennifer Tice Walker did not answer questions about the change. But Clarke said he was told in a meeting last week with head of stores Jamie Nordstrom that LGBTQ employees said The Salvation Army’s presence made them uncomfortable,” the Seattle Times reports.

The disdain for the Christian charity isn’t just effecting bell ringers. Just before Christmas, a fleet of Salvation Army vans in Kansas City were sabotaged, leaving them unable to deliver holiday meals and toys for under privileged children.

Despite the obvious need for this type of charity, the Salvation Army has been under attack in recent months after Democrat Presidential Candidate Pete Buttigieg was photographed ringing a bell for them and the woke mob decided that they were bad for being religious.


“Pete Buttigieg Volunteered for the Homophobic Salvation Army,” a headline in the gay magazine Out read.

The left also bullied Chik-fil-A into stopping their donations to the organization.

“The city of Seattle, which like King County contracts with The Salvation Army to provide homeless shelters, will next month begin an ‘equity audit’ in response to ‘concerns expressed by the community that Salvation Army is not a safe place for LBGTQ persons experiencing homelessness,’ wrote Jason Johnson, acting director of the city’s Human Services Department, in a letter to Salvation Army officials in early December,” the Seattle Times report continues.

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