Friday, February 22, 2019

VIDEO=> Antifa Leftist In “Smash The Patriarchy” Shirt SHOT By Police After Pulling GUN At Middle School

A person (who apparently uses they/them/their pronouns) was ventilated by police officers at Cascade Middle School in Eugene, Oregon, after they pulled a gun on the officers who were attempting to take them into custody. The entire incident was captured by body cameras worn by the police officers.

The ma’an, identified as Charlie Landeros, can be seen wearing a shirt that reads “Smash The Patriarchy And Chill” as police are wrestling them to the ground. Landeros draws a handgun from their waistband, and the two officers try to gain control of their arm, as Landeros points the gun at the officers. Then the cops opened fire.

The unedited video is courtesy of KATU News:

Landeros was a well known leftist activist in the Eugene, having led and participated in protests, specifically at University Of Oregon.

Charles Landeros (left) holds a megaphone during a protest at University of Oregon during the college president’s State Of University address in 2017. Photo courtesy of student newspaper Daily Emerald.

According to the U of O student newspaper, The Daily Emerald, Landeros was also a member of an armed antifa group known as “Community Armed Self Defense.”

From the Daily Emerald:

Landeros, who used they/them/theirs pronouns, led a student protest in October 2017 that disrupted UO President Michael Schill’s state of the university address. Landeros and other protestors characterized Schill as a CEO and said that the purpose of the protest was to “empower marginalized students on campus.”

Landeros was a member of Community Armed Self Defense, a group that was created as a “new liberatory and inclusive space for all oppressed peoples to learn about armed self-defense,” according to the group’s Facebook page, which is no longer publicly available on Facebook as of 4 p.m. Saturday.

Community Armed Self Defense’s Facebook page said that they could not count on the police to protect marginalized people, and that firearms help marginalized groups protect themselves.

“The police are not here to protect us. They are more likely to harm us themselves than they are to ‘serve or protect’ us,” the group wrote on their Facebook page description.

The Daily Emerald had also written several stories involving Landeros’s antics when they led students to protest the university’s president during a speech. They apparently faced code of conduct violations and were disciplined by the university. According to another issue of the Emerald, they appealed these sanctions but were ultimately denied relief.


KATU news reports that officers involved acted appropriately and the Lane County District Attorney will not pursue charges against them. Evidently there was some sort of custody covfefe over Landeros’s children, and that’s why they were at the school.

One organization that Landeros was involved with is the Civil Liberties Defence Center, which wrote a long eulogy on their site. Their entire statement reads:

“Do not let anyone quench your fire. Do not let them dismiss your love nor pacify your rage. My love, do not water yourself down.” – Love and Rage, poem by Charlie Landeros. #LoveAndRage4Charlie

Charles (Charlie) Landeros was a 30-year-old person who was shot and killed by unknown Eugene police officer(s) on the morning of January 11, 2019.  Charlie was born in Hong Kong, and migrated with their*[1]family to the US, where Charlie was raised on Kalapuya land in Eugene, Oregon. Charlie attended Cascade Middle School, also where they were tragically killed yesterday, and graduated from Willamette High School, enlisted in the Army at age 17. Upon being honorably discharged from the military, they attended the University of Oregon.  Charlie was most proud of being a parent to two daughters ages 10 and 12.

In addition to the children, Charlie Landeros leaves behind their partner, parents, a younger brother, and numerous other family members and friends. “The biggest thing is trying to figure out how to live without my older sibling, my lifelong support. Charlie has always been there for me when I needed them, but never again. I have accepted this, but I still don’t know how to go from here,” said Joesph Landeros, Charlie’s brother.

The details of this homicide are still largely unknown.  What is known is that Charlie had recently enrolled their daughter at Cascade Middle school as the custodial parent. The school contacted Charlie regarding their child’s safety, and Charlie went to the school to ensure the safety of this child.  We also know that Charlie was shot multiple times by Eugene Police Officer(s), several feet in front of the main entrance to the school.

The family of the deceased requests that the community recognize that deaths like Charlie’s are neither accidental or uncommon. “Charlie was the beating heart of every project they were involved in, the beating heart of our community,” said Ariel, Charlie’s partner. “We will need to learn how to regrow from that, because Charlie’s reach was so big.”

While people of color comprise 38.5 percent of the U.S. population, they make up 51.5 percent of those killed by police.  In spite of this staggering statistic, there is no national database that police departments must submit a record to when they complete an investigation after an officer shoots a civilian.

Despite law enforcement’s willful ignorance, in the last several years there have been far too many headlines describing people of color being shot and killed by police. The lesson learned: the experience of dealing with police in America is different for whites and nonwhites. Charlie was of mixed Filipino and Mexican descent.

Unlike the investigation into the police shooting death of fellow veteran Brian Babb, the family demands that this investigation be transparent, unbiased and thorough.

Donations to fund the independent investigation into Charlie’s homicide by police can be made at:  https://cldc.org/donate/ and please note that your donation is in memory of Charlie Landeros.

[1]* Charlie’s gender pronouns are they/theirs.

(Do you know how hard it is to avoid using “he” and “his” through this story? I’m sure all of the “they” and “their” references will confuse many readers.)

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