University of Tennessee Professor Claims ‘Diversity of Thought’ is Racist

In an op-ed published on Friday by Inside Higher Ed, Professor Victor Ray wrote that the right’s “call for so-called diversity of thought is a Trojan horse for white identity politics.”

Professor Victor Ray

Ray’s article was focused on calls for broadening ideological diversity on campus, as Republican students have frequently been silenced or unable to host speakers who share their views.

In his piece, Ray lays out “three faulty premises” of support for diversity of thought. He claims that people on the right are not supporting the freedom of ideas in “good faith,” that that conservative ideas are not marginalized in higher education, and that it “should be strongly questioned is the very idea that conservative thought is diverse.”

“Certain conservative foundations, activists and professors have used diversity of thought as a political tactic to exert power over higher educational institutions. This rhetorical move — like appeals to merit or free speech — works precisely because everyone likes to believe that so-called diversity of thought is an unabashed good. Robust debate in the search of truth is a general academic principle. The key here is that this is a political project aimed at making racist and misogynist ideas acceptable,” Ray wrote.

Ray also claims that “the majority of people advocating for [diversity of thought] are white men.”

“Robust debate in the search of truth is a general academic principle. The key here is that [diversity of thought] is a political project aimed at making racist and misogynist ideas acceptable,” Ray contends.

Campus Reform, who first reported on the op-ed has reached out to Ray for comment, but did not receive a response by the time of publishing. Gateway Pundit has also reached out to the far-left professor and will update this story if a comment is provided.


According to Ray’s bio on the university’s website, his areas of interest include “Race and Ethnicity, Gender, Stratification, Qualitative Methods.”

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