Forced Diversity: Obama Administration Begins Redistributing Poor Inner City Families to US Suburbs

Obama administration begins redistributing poor inner-city families to suburbs.
obama suburbs

Author Stanley Kurtz argued in his book Spreading The Wealth: How Obama Is Robbing The Suburbs To Pay For the Cites that Barack Obama’s grand socialist plan included redistributing wealth from American suburbs to the inner city.

Obama passed regulations in 2013 to force suburban neighborhoods with no record of housing discrimination to build more public housing targeted to ethnic and racial minorities.

According to Kurtz, the underlying thrust of the rule change was to force racial and ethnic diversity on the suburbs:

The new HUD rule is really about changing the way Americans live. It is part of a broader suite of initiatives designed to block suburban development, press Americans into hyper-dense cities, and force us out of our cars. Government-mandated ethnic and racial diversification plays a role in this scheme, yet the broader goal is forced “economic integration.”

The ultimate vision is to make all neighborhoods more or less alike, turning traditional cities into ultra-dense Manhattans, while making suburbs look more like cities do now. In this centrally-planned utopia, steadily increasing numbers will live cheek-by-jowl in “stack and pack” high-rises close to public transportation, while automobiles fall into relative disuse.

In June the Obama administration moved forward with regulations designed to help diversify America’s wealthier neighborhoods. The regulations would force communities to build affordable housing in more affluent areas in order to receive federal grant money.

But, you wouldn’t know about this radical program if you watched the ABC, CBS or NBC. They hid this story from their viewers.

FOX News was the only channel to inform viewers on this big government overreach.
Via NewsBusters:

While the country slept the Obama administration began redistributing poor families to the suburbs.
The Baltimore Sun reported:

Danielle Hill has a secret, one she shares with dozens of other residents of Baltimore public housing. It goes like this: They don’t live in the city.

Instead, they live in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties, in houses purchased by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City. Thousands more have moved to the counties with special rent subsidies in a companion program.

Hill’s family is among nearly 10,000 black women and children who have moved into overwhelmingly white, prosperous suburbs through a court-ordered relocation program designed to combat the intense inner-city segregation and poverty forged by decades of discrimination.

That relocation program — one of the nation’s largest — has been discreetly rolled out to avoid the political and community opposition that routinely arises to defeat proposals for building subsidized housing in Baltimore’s suburbs. Hill’s Cockeysville townhouse, for example, was purchased by the city through a nonprofit organization based in the suburbs, with little notice to elected Baltimore County officials or the public.

“We did it very much under the radar,” Amy Wilkinson, fair housing director for the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, said of the home purchases. “We met very early on with the county executives. They understood we had to do it. Their request was to make sure [the homes] are really scattered and make sure we do it quietly.”

The relocations have provided greater opportunities for Hill and thousands of others who were trapped in public housing complexes in Baltimore neighborhoods troubled by drugs, violence and poor schools. But efforts to limit information about the moves highlight the difficulties in working to dismantle Baltimore’s segregated, impoverished neighborhoods — even as Freddie Gray’s death and the ensuing rioting have focused new attention on the issue.

While local officials in the Baltimore area — one of the most segregated in the nation — have ramped up collaborative efforts to meet federal fair-housing standards, they concede that more needs to be done to provide more affordable homes in prosperous neighborhoods. The need is obvious: More than 100,000 people are on waiting lists for subsidized housing in the region, with Baltimore bearing the biggest burden. Most counties have not taken two steps that advocates say are essential: requiring developers to set aside housing for low-income tenants and prohibiting landlords from refusing to accept tenants with federal rent subsidies.

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