New York state authorities are planning to step-up surveillance – this time, on little kids.
The program, which will be launched state-wide, is supposed to gather information on students starting from the age of five. The system contains names, attendance records, disciplinary histories, addresses, test scores and learning disabilities.

The New York Daily News reported:

In an unprecedented move, education officials will hand over personal student data to a new private company to create a national database for businesses that contract with public schools.

Working with the city, state education officials are already uploading private information about students — their names, addresses, test scores, learning disabilities, attendance and disciplinary records — into a $100 million database called inBloom.

Parents are furious that New York is joining eight other states in adopting the model without giving families a chance to opt out of sharing delicate information.

“I’m outraged,” said Karen Sprowal, 52, a stay-at-home mom. Her 9-year-old son is a fourth-grader at Public School 75 in Manhattan.

“I send my child to school to be educated. I never agreed to have his information shared with private companies or stored in a database.”

 

ADVERTISEMENT

 

Disable Refresh for 30 Days

Cookies and JavaScript must be enabled for your setting to be saved.

© Copyright 2014, TheGatewayPundit.com. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Web Development By Arlington Kirk