Thousands of Christians sought refuge today after Islamic militias slaughtered hundreds in Bangui.
The Christians gathered at the airport hoping for protection from French soldiers.

France sent in soldiers as the country teeters on total anarchy.
central africa airport
Internally displaced people gather at bangui’s airport, Central African Republic, Friday Dec. 6 2013, as French military helicopters land, a day after gun battles between Seleka soldiers and Christian militias left over 100 dead and scores wounded. To try to put an end to sectarian violence, the UN security council passed a motion allowing French troops to deploy in the country in order to protect civilians and insure security by all necessary means.

The AP reported:

Thousands of Christian civilians sought refuge at an airport guarded by French soldiers Friday, fleeing from the mostly Muslim ex-rebels with machetes and guns who rule the country a day after the worst violence to hit the chaotic capital in nine months.

When several French helicopters landed at the airport, people sang with joy as they banged on plastic buckets and waved rags into the air in celebration.

Outside the barbed wire fences of the airport, bodies lay decomposing along the roads in a capital too dangerous for many to collect the corpses. Thursday’s clashes left at least 280 dead, according to national radio, and have raised fears that waves of retaliatory attacks could soon follow.

“They are slaughtering us like chickens,” said Appolinaire Donoboy, a Christian whose family remained in hiding.

France had pledged to increase its presence in its former colony well before Christian militias attacked the capital at dawn Thursday. The arrival of additional French troops and equipment came as the capital teetered on the brink of total anarchy and represented the greatest hope for many Central Africans.

About 1,000 French forces were expected to be on the ground by Friday evening, a French defense official said on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

As night fell across the near anarchic capital, Christians fearing retaliatory attacks by the mostly Muslim ex-rebels crowded as close to the runway as possible, laying out their woven mats in front of a barbed wire coiled fence. National radio announced that at least 280 people had died, citing figures from local Red Cross officials.

The U.S. State Department said it was “deeply concerned” by the violence and praised France’s quick intervention.

 

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