Flashback: Obama Administration Pushes UN Resolution That Bans Criticism of Islam

Last December the Obama Administration pushed a UN resolution that banned criticism of Islam.
Now this.

Nakoula Basseley Nakoula (C) is escorted out of his home by Los Angeles County Sheriff’s officers in Cerritos, California September 15, 2012. Mr. Nakoula, a California man convicted of bank fraud has been escorted to an interview with federal officers probing possible probation violations stemming from the making of an anti-Islam video that has triggered violent protests in the Muslim world, police said on Saturday.
(BRET HARTMAN/REUTERS)

The Obama Administration helped the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) push through their resolution condemning the stereotyping, negative profiling and stigmatization of people based on religion. Team Obama led the way for the resolution to pass through the General Assembly back in December 2011.
CNS News reported:

The U.N. General Assembly on Monday adopted a resolution condemning the stereotyping, negative profiling and stigmatization of people based on their religion, and urging countries to take effective steps “to address and combat such incidents.”

No member state called for a recorded vote on the text, which was as a result adopted “by consensus.”

The resolution, an initiative of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), is based on one passed by the U.N.’s Human Rights Council in Geneva last spring. The State Department last week hosted a meeting to discuss ways of “implementing” it.

Every year since 1999 the OIC has steered through the U.N.’s human rights apparatus a resolution condemning the “defamation of religion,” which for the bloc of 56 Muslim states covered incidents ranging from satirizing Mohammed in a newspaper cartoon to criticism of shari’a and post-9/11 security check profiling.

Critics regard the measure as an attempt to outlaw valid and critical scrutiny of Islamic teachings, as some OIC states do through controversial blasphemy laws at home.

Strongly opposed by mostly Western democracies, the divisive “defamation” resolution received a dwindling number of votes each year, with the margin of success falling from 57 votes in 2007 to 19 in 2009 and just 12 last year.

This year’s text was a departure, in that it dropped the “defamation” language and included a paragraph that reaffirms “the positive role that the exercise of the right to freedom of opinion and expression and the full respect for the freedom to seek, receive and impart information can play in strengthening democracy and combating religious intolerance.”

The nod to freedom of expression won the resolution the support of the U.S. and other democracies, with the Obama administration and others hailing it as a breakthrough after years of acrimonious debate.

US Muslim groups welcomed the U.N. resolution condemning religious intolerance.
The American Muslim Perspective reported:

Leading American Muslim civil advocacy groups have welcomed passage of a United Nations resolution that condemns the stereotyping, negative profiling and stigmatization of people based on their religion, and urging countries to take effective steps “to address and combat such incidents.”

The resolution also expressed concern about growing incitement to religious hatred worldwide.

The resolution — sponsored by the 57-nation Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and adopted with participation of the United States and the European Union — was adopted by consensus of the 193 members of the United Nations.

The resolution declares that “discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief constitutes a violation of human rights.” It also expressed concern about the incitement to religious hatred and the failure of some states “to combat this burgeoning trend.”

The resolution calls on states “to take effective measures to ensure that public functionaries in the conduct of their public duties do not discriminate against an individual on the basis of religion or belief.”

Governments also are expected to make “a strong effort to counter religious profiling, which is understood to be the invidious use of religion as a criterion in conducting questionings, searches and other law enforcement investigative procedures.”

And, just think, it only took them nine months to start interrogating filmmakers.
Makes you look forward to another four years of this administration, huh?

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