You Can’t Make This Up: Experts are Now Investigating Whether Milk is Racist in Government-Funded Study on Dairy’s Ties to Colonialism

“The milk traces in ancient pots confirms the story that bones have been telling us about how pastoralists lived in eastern Africa 5,000 to 3,000 years ago—an area still famous for cattle herding and the historic way of life of people such as Maasai and Turkana,” says Fiona Marshall. (Credit: mar is sea Y/Flickr)

The Maasai in Kenya, a notorious “White Supremacy” known for their traditional cattle-raising practices, have been consuming milk for centuries as a staple part of their diet.

The Maasai value cattle, and the size of their herds indicates their status in the community. Maasai women are responsible for milking the cows, and the milk is a key part of their diet, appearing in almost every meal.

The Maasai drink milk raw or soured, in tea, or turned into butter, which is especially important for infants. They also produce a traditional fermented milk product called kule naoto from unpasteurized whole milk from zebu cows, which they consume in large quantities, averaging 2–3 liters per person per day.

(Credit: mar is sea Y/Flickr)
(Credit: mar is sea Y/Flickr)

In the latest display of far-left absurdity, taxpayer money is now being funneled into a study investigating the supposed ties between milk and colonialism.

Back in 2018, the New York Times published an article titled, “Why White Supremacists Are Chugging Milk (and Why Geneticists Are Alarmed).” In 2017, leftist PETA also published an article titled, “Why Cow’s Milk Is the Perfect Drink for Supremacists.”

Now, it seems academics at Oxford are jumping on the bandwagon, ready to dissect the ‘political nature’ of milk and its so-called ‘colonial legacies.’

This new project, intriguingly titled ‘Milking it: colonialism, heritage & everyday engagement with dairy’, has won funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, according to the Daily Mail.

The council itself is funded by the Government through the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, and awards around £110 million ($140 million) to researchers at universities and independent organisations, the news outlet added.

The exact size of the grant has not yet been revealed. The museum stated that the project aims to centre on heritage as a vital framework for understanding how colonial legacies influence contemporary issues and affect people’s lives.

Through a variety of methods including milk diaries, archival research, and participatory podcasting, it will investigate historical engagement with milk, building networks with consumers and producers in Britain and Kenya.

Daily Mail reported:

Dr Zetterstrom-Sharp, a University College London associate professor at the Institute of Archaeology, and Dr JC Niala, head of research at the History of Science Museum.

Dr Zetterstrom-Sharp took part in a talk titled Milk and Whiteness during a Wellcome Trust exhibition on milk in 2022.

In the panel discussion, she said a ‘Northern European obsession with milk’ had led to the assumption that it was a vital part of any human diet, and should be produced and provided on a vast scale.

The Wellcome Trust exhibition highlighted the imposition of dairy economies by colonial powers, including in regions where populations had high levels of lactose intolerance.

Dr Zetterstrom-Sharp also highlighted issues with the way local milk production in Africa may have been quashed in favour of industrial methods aimed at producing greater volume, and how milk has been distributed by aid organisations.

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Jim Hᴏft is the founder and editor of The Gateway Pundit, one of the top conservative news outlets in America. Jim was awarded the Reed Irvine Accuracy in Media Award in 2013 and is the proud recipient of the Breitbart Award for Excellence in Online Journalism from the Americans for Prosperity Foundation in May 2016.

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