Air Force Seeks Help From Public in Finding Missing F-35 Jet Lost Over South Carolina After Pilot Ejected

The Air Force is asking the public for help finding a lost Marine Corps F-35 jet that was last seen over South Carolina Sunday afternoon after the pilot safely ejected. The pilot parachuted into a residential neighborhood where he landed in a backyard and was taken to hospital in stable condition, while the plane apparently pulled a Twilight Zone.

Have you seen this jet? Please call 843-963-3600.

The first F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 501 arrived at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, July 17, 2014., photo by Cpl. John Wilkes, USMC.

Source.

Joint Base Charleston posted a statement on X Twitter late Sunday afternoon seeking help from the public in finding the lost jet, “We’re working with @MCASBeaufortSC to locate an F-35 that was involved in a mishap this afternoon. The pilot ejected safely. If you have any information that may help our recovery teams locate the F-35, please call the Base Defense Operations Center at 843-963-3600…Based on the jet’s last-known position and in coordination with the FAA, we are focusing our attention north of JB Charleston, around Lake Moultrie and Lake Marion.”

A statement with more details was posted to Facebook, “Personnel from Joint Base Charleston and Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort(MCAS Beaufort SC)are responding to a mishap involving an F-35B Lightning II jet from Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 with the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. The pilot ejected safely and was transferred to a local medical center in stable condition. Emergency response teams are still trying to locate the F-35. The public is asked to cooperate with military and civilian authorities as the effort continues. If you have any information that would assist the recovery teams, please call the JB Charleston Base Defense Operations Center at 843-963-3600.”

AVGeekery.com reported the incident (excerpt):

A Marine Corps F-35B pilot safely ejected from his stealth fighter jet this afternoon next to Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina. Details are few as of now, but base PA has confirmed the incident.

Radio chatter said the pilot ejected at just a few thousand feet above the ground, with last radar contact a few miles northeast of Lake Moultrie. The pilot made it out safely, and then showed up a few miles away in a backyard of a residential neighborhood on South Kenwood Drive in North Charleston. The weather was horrible at the time he ejected.

WCBD-TV excerpt:

According to officials, a pilot was found on South Kenwood Drive in North Charleston after safely ejecting from the passing plane.

Joint Base Charleston says the pilot was transported to a local medical center and is in stable condition.

His wingman, in another aircraft, safely landed at Joint Base Charleston.

Map showing the two lakes, Moultrie and Marion, mentioned in the Air Force statement. The jet could be in one of the lakes, the Atlantic Ocean or the Twilight Zone.

Monday morning update: The jet is still lost. Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) slams woke Pentagon, “A Pentagon obsessed with funding abortion travel and unfairly attacking @SenTuberville is bound to lose a lot more than this F-35.”

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Thanks for sharing!