Warren Scrubs DNA Test Rollout From Campaign Site And Twitter

A year ago, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who for decades had claimed to be Native American, decided to prove it by taking a DNA test.

It did not go well.

The test results showed she may have had an American Indian ancestor — six to 10 generations ago. That means she is anywhere from 1/64 to 1/1,024 American Indian. To put those terms into percentages, that means she’s between 1.562% and .0924% Indian, which means she’s anywhere from 98.437% to 99.9% white.

President Trump has hammered her for years, calling the Massachusetts Democrat “Pocahontas.” After she released the test, Trump wrote on Twitter: “Pocahontas (the bad version), sometimes referred to as Elizabeth Warren, is getting slammed. She took a bogus DNA test and it showed that she may be 1/1024, far less than the average American.”

Later, Trump wrote: “Now that her claims of being of Indian heritage have turned out to be a scam and a lie, Elizabeth Warren should apologize for perpetrating this fraud against the American Public. Harvard called her ‘a person of color’ (amazing con), and would not have taken her otherwise!”

And apparently, Warren doesn’t want to remember that DNA test rollout.

“It appears she and her campaign removed all tweets, videos, and webpages that documented the elaborate rollout,” PJ Media reported.


Writer Jim Treacher said the Warren campaign deleted its tweets and the video “has been deleted from YouTube as well. The whole ‘Heritage’ section of her campaign site has been memory-holed.”

She lied, then she lied about her lie, and now she’s deleted all evidence of her lies. No wonder so many Democrats love her.

Warren listed herself as Native in the Association of American Law School Directory, and according to The Boston Globe, she “had her ethnicity changed from white to Native American at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she taught from 1987 to 1995, and at Harvard University Law School, where she was a tenured faculty member starting in 1995.”

Some critics say she got the Harvard slot by claiming to be American Indian. “Harvard Law School in the 1990s touted Warren, then a professor in Cambridge, as being Native American,’” CNN reported last November. “They singled her out, Warren later acknowledged, because she had listed herself as a minority in an Association of American Law Schools directory.”

A 1997 Fordham Law Review article identified the Democrat as Harvard Law’s “first woman of color.” Warren even submitted recipes to an American Indian cookbook called “Pow Wow Chow,” which was released in 1984 by the Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogee, Oklahoma. She signed her entries “Elizabeth Warren — Cherokee.”

In a statement after Warren released the test results, from Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said “Senator Warren is undermining tribal interests with her continued claims of tribal heritage.”

“A DNA test is useless to determine tribal citizenship. Current DNA tests do not even distinguish whether a person’s ancestors were indigenous to North or South America,” Hoskin said. “Sovereign tribal nations set their own legal requirements for citizenship, and while DNA tests can be used to determine lineage, such as paternity to an individual, it is not evidence for tribal affiliation. Using a DNA test to lay claim to any connection to the Cherokee Nation or any tribal nation, even vaguely, is inappropriate and wrong. It makes a mockery out of DNA tests and its legitimate uses while also dishonoring legitimate tribal governments and their citizens, whose ancestors are well documented and whose heritage is proven.”

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