‘Shoot. Me. Now.’ Obama Said In Note To Aide When Biden Droned On, New Book Says

U.S. President Barack Obama, left, listens as U.S. Vice President Joseph "Joe" Biden speaks during a 21st Century Cures Act signing ceremony in the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016. The bill makes new investments to address the recent opioid epidemic, accelerate discoveries in cancer research and take important steps to improve mental health and the Food and Drug Administrations drug development process. Photographer:

Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

“Shoot. Me. Now.”

That’s what then-president Barack Obama, rolling his eyes, said in a note to his aide as Joe Biden babbled on, according to a new book.

The book, Barack and Joe: The Making of an Extraordinary Partnership, is written by Steven Levingston and Michael Eric Dyson and will hit shelves Oct. 8.

 

“A vivid and inspiring account of the “bromance” between Barack Obama and Joe Biden,” says a blurb on Amazon.

The extraordinary partnership of Barack Obama and Joe Biden is unique in American history. The two men, their characters and styles sharply contrasting, formed a dynamic working relationship that evolved into a profound friendship. Their affinity was not predestined. Obama and Biden began wary of each other: Obama an impatient freshman disdainful of the Senate’s plodding ways; Biden a veteran of the chamber and proud of its traditions.

Gradually they came to respect each other’s values and strengths and rode into the White House together in 2008. Side-by-side through two tension-filled terms, they shared the day-to-day joys and struggles of leading the most powerful nation on earth. They accommodated each other’s quirks: Biden’s famous miscues kept coming, and Obama overlooked them knowing they were insignificant except as media fodder. With his expertise in foreign affairs and legislative matters, Biden took on an unprecedented role as chief adviser to Obama, reshaping the vice presidency. Together Obama and Biden guided Americans through a range of historic moments: a devastating economic crisis, racial confrontations, war in Afghanistan, and the dawn of same-sex marriage nationwide. They supported each other through highs and lows: Obama provided a welcome shoulder during the illness and death of Biden’s son Beau.

The book, though, says Obama was not willing to support Biden in the 2016 presidential race as he was more concerned about his legacy and what would happen should Biden lose. He thought Hillary Clinton would beat Biden in the race for the Democratic nomination.

“Joe, despite his many virtues, was just another white guy, one in a long line of American presidents — hardly the symbol of the Teutonic change that Obama hoped would mark his place in the history books,” the authors write, according to the Daily Mail.

“Barack had placed his bet on Hillary, the one he believed would confirm his revolutionary stamp on American’s political culture – the first black president passing the baton to the first woman president.”


In April, when Biden announced he would be running for the Democratic presidential nomination, Obama issued a statement through spokeswoman Katie Hill.

“President Obama has long said that selecting Joe Biden as his running mate in 2008 was one of the best decisions he ever made. He relied on the Vice President’s knowledge, insight, and judgment throughout both campaigns and the entire presidency. The two forged a special bond over the last 10 years and remain close today,” the statement said.

But the statement was notably lacking a formal endorsement.

Biden, though, said he had personally asked Obama not to issue an endorsement. “I asked President Obama not to endorse, and he doesn’t want to. Listen, we should — whoever wins this nomination should win it on their own merits,” he said when asked by reporters why Obama had not endorsed him.

Biden is still making sure people don’t forget his longtime bromance with Obama, however. In an Instagram post on the day he announced his candidacy, Biden included a snapshot of himself and Obama in the Oval Office.

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