Reminder: Take a Look at the Temperatures in 1936 – They Blow All of the Current Temps Away by Far

1936 was the hottest summer on record in the United States.

United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres announced on Thursday that the era of global warming has ended and the era of global boiling has arrived.

Gutterez claimed that July 2023 will set records for being the hottest month on record.

Of course, his statements were meant to scare the West to invest in more Chinese windmills and solar panels and to destroy the energy sector in the United States.

And the threats are all based on lies.

It is as if the heatwaves in 1936 never happened.

The percentage of the US that reaches 100 degrees F last year was at a record low.
The elites won’t tell you that.

The five hottest July 25ths ever recorded were all before 1953.

The temperatures in 1936 were much worse than this year.

It’s well documented that 1936 was the real scorcher.

Here is a list of the US July temperatures in 1936.

On July 9, temperature’s spiked, with many all-time record highs being set in both the Great Lakes and Northeast United States. The recap of temperatures are as follows for July 9th.

Rockford, IL: 101 °F (38 °C)[22]

Pittsburgh, PA: 101 °F (38 °C)

Syracuse, NY: 102 °F (39 °C)

Rochester, NY: 102 °F (39 °C)

Detroit, MI: 102 °F (39 °C)[28]

Philadelphia, PA: 103 °F (39 °C)

Albany, NY: 103 °F (39 °C)[29]

Baltimore, MD: 103 °F (39 °C)

Scranton, PA: 103 °F (39 °C)

Washington DC: 104 °F (40 °C)

Johnstown, PA: 104 °F (40 °C)

Columbus, OH: 105 °F (40.6 °C)

Warren, OH: 105 °F (40.6 °C)

Williamsport, PA: 106 °F (41.1 °C)

Trenton, NJ: 106 °F (41.1 °C)

Central Park, New York City: 106 °F (41.1 °C)

On July 10, the heat peaked in Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, with some areas setting all-time record highs in parts of the South and most of the Midwest. The recap is as follows.

Atlanta, GA: 100 °F (37.8 °C)

Pittsburgh PA: 101 °F (38.3 °C)

Detroit, MI: 102 °F (38.9 °C)[28]

Grand Rapids, MI: 102 °F (38.9 °C)[26]

Central Park, New York City: 102 °F (38.9 °C)[5]

Youngstown, OH: 103 °F (39.4 °C)

Philadelphia, PA: 104 °F (40.0 °C)

Richmond, VA: 105 °F (40.6 °C)

Washington DC: 105 °F (40.6 °C)

Lynchburg, VA: 106 °F (41.1 °C)

Rockford, IL: 106 °F (41.1 °C)[22]

Bowling Green, KY: 106 °F (41.1 °C)

St. Cloud, MN: 106 °F (41.1 °C)[30]

Baltimore, MD: 107 °F (41.7 °C)

Lexington, KY: 108 °F (42.2 °C)

Xenia, OH: 108 °F (42.2 °C)

Cumberland & Frederick, MD: 109 °F (42.8 °C)

Runyon, NJ: 110 °F (43.3 °C)

Phoenixville, PA: 111 °F (43.9 °C)

Martinsburg, WV: 112 °F (44.4 °C)

Aberdeen, SD: 114 °F (45.6 °C)

On July 11, 1936, the heat began subsiding in the Northeast, though highs were still in the 90’s. The heat wave temporarily stopped spreading but was still heavily impacting areas like Bismarck, ND that recorded low of only 83°.

On July 13, the heat spread south through the Great Plains, with Wichita, Kansas reporting a high of 101 °F (38.3 °C), Fort Smith, Arkansas hitting 106 °F (41.1 °C), Tulsa, Oklahoma hitting 107 °F (41.7 °C), and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma hitting 101 °F (38.3 °C). Elsewhere, temperatures began to significantly rise with multiple areas hitting above 110 °F (43.3 °C). The recap is as follows:

Columbus, OH: 101 °F (38.3 °C)

Detroit, MI: 102 °F (38.9 °C)[28]

Green Bay, WI: 104 °F (40.0 °C)[24]

Minneapolis, MN: 105 °F (40.6 °C)[30]

Alpena, MI: 106 °F (41.1 °C)

Madison, WI: 106 °F (41.1 °C)[23]

Duluth, MN: 106 °F (41.1 °C)[25]

St. Cloud, MN: 107 °F (41.7 °C)[30]

Decatur, IL: 108 °F (42.2 °C)[18]

Grand Rapids, MI: 108 °F (42.2 °C)[26]

Evansville, IN: 108 °F (42.2 °C)

Kalamazoo, MI: 109 °F (42.8 °C)[26]

Rockford, IL: 110 °F (43.3 °C)[22]

Saginaw, MI: 111 °F (43.9 °C)[28]

Eau Claire, WI: 111 °F (43.9 °C)[31]

Waterloo, IA: 112 °F (44.4 °C)[21]

Mt. Vernon, IL: 112 °F (44.4 °C)[18]

Mio, MI: 112 °F (44.4 °C)

Henderson, KY: 113 °F (45.0 °C)

Wisconsin Dells, WI: 114 °F (45.6 °C)

July 14 was the peak day of the heat wave for most areas with countless record-breaking temperatures broken across many areas. The records are as follows.

Detroit, MI: 104 °F (40.0 °C) (105 °F (40.6 °C) on July 24, 1934)

Springfield, MO: 104 °F (40.0 °C) (113 °F (45.0 °C) in 1954)

Indianapolis, IN: 106 °F (41.1 °C) (tied July 22, 1901 and July 21, 1934)[32]

Columbus, OH: 106 °F (41.1 °C) (tied July 21, 1934)

Cincinnati, OH: 106 °F (41.1 °C) (tied July 24, 1934)

Madison, WI: 107 °F (41.7 °C)[23]

Louisville, KY: 107 °F (41.7 °C)

Kalamazoo, MI: 108 °F (42.2 °C)[26]

Minneapolis, MN: 108 °F (42.2 °C)[30]

Rochester, MN: 108 °F (42.2 °C)

Xenia, OH: 108 °F (42.2 °C)

St. Louis, MO: 108 °F (42.2 °C) (115 °F (46.1 °C) in 1954)

Lima, OH: 109 °F (42.8 °C)

Cedar Rapids, IA: 109 °F (42.8 °C)[18]

Dubuque, IA: 110 °F (43.3 °C)

Terre Haute, IN: 110 °F (43.3 °C)

Springfield, IL: 110 °F (43.3 °C) (112 °F (44.4 °C) in 1954)[18]

Decatur, IL: 110 °F (43.3 °C) (113 °F (45.0 °C) in 1954)[18]

Moline, IL: 111 °F (43.9 °C)[18]

Burlington, IA: 111 °F (43.9 °C)[18]

Rockford, IL: 112 °F (44.4 °C)[22]

Waterloo, IA: 112 °F (44.4 °C)[18]

Palestine, IL: 112 °F (44.4 °C) (114 °F (45.6 °C) in 1954)[18]

Mt. Vernon, IL: 114 °F (45.6 °C)[18]

Collegeville, IN: 116 °F (46.7 °C)

On July 15, temperatures finally began to decline over most areas while other isolated areas still saw temperatures increase. Missouri hit an all-time high of 115 °F (46.1 °C) in Clinton, Missouri. Peoria, IL hit 113 °F (45.0 °C) and Quincy hit 114 °F (45.6 °C), setting all-time records for those cities.[18] In Iowa, many cities tied the records set the previous day. However, in the Great Plains temperatures continued to rise as a new heat wave began to develop.

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Jim Hoft is the founder and editor of The Gateway Pundit, one of the top conservative news outlets in America. Jim was awarded the Reed Irvine Accuracy in Media Award in 2013 and is the proud recipient of the Breitbart Award for Excellence in Online Journalism from the Americans for Prosperity Foundation in May 2016. In 2023, The Gateway Pundit received the Most Trusted Print Media Award at the American Liberty Awards.

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