Elizabeth Warren’s Son-In-Law Produced Film Funded by Iranian Regime

If you didn’t know, fake Indian Elizabeth Warren’s daughter, Amelia, is married to an actual Indian from India, Sushil Tyagi. That’s him in the pic above, looking older that Pocahontas. Tyagi is, among other things, a film producer. Back in 2008, as president of Tricolor Films and Algorithmic Productions, he worked on a film called The Song Of Sparrows with writer and director Majid Majidi. Majidi would go on to produce a film called Muhammad: The Messenger of God in 2015.

But that’s not all. Apparently Song Of Sparrows was funded by the Iranian government. Breitbart reports:

Democrat presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-MA) son-in-law, with whom she is close, has troubling ties to the Iranian regime, according to a new book by Peter Schweizer.

The book, Profiles in Corruption, reveals progressive leaders’ little-known ties to corrupt businesses and governments and discusses the Massachusetts senator in a chapter.

The chapter details the business deals of Warren’s son-in-law, Sushil Tyagi, who is married to her daughter, Amelia. Tyagi was born in India but moved to the United States, where he met Amelia while they were both pursuing MBAs at Wharton Business School.

Tyagi runs Tricolor Films, and in 2008, produced a film called The Song of Sparrows, directed by Iranian filmmaker Majid Majidi.

The film was described as Majidi’s “most religious” and is about a man who is fired from his job on an ostrich farm, moves to the big city and becomes a motorcycle taxi driver, and soon becomes consumed with his passengers’ lives and is swept up in a world of greed. It is his family that help him restore his “caring and generous nature,” according to a film synopsis.

Tyagi was listed as the film’s sole producer on a New York Times page, in credits which have now been deleted. A look back at the page’s archive revealed that the film was funded by the Iranian government agency that is overseen by Iranian propagandists.

Schweizer writes:

“The full credits of the film, for some reason, seem to also have been scrubbed from the internet. We obtained a copy by using the Wayback machine and made a startling discovery: the movie’s chief investors included none other than the social deputy of the State Welfare Organization (SWO) of Iran (SWO-“معاونت اجتماعی سازمان بهزیستی کشور”) as well as the Cultural and Artistic Organization of Tehran. (“سازمان فرهنگی و هنری شهرداری تهران”)

These two investors in the film might appear at first glance to be innocuous cultural organizations—but they are not. Both are funded and controlled by the Islamist Iranian government.

The Cultural and Artistic Organization of Tehran states: “This organization was founded in 1996 and [does] its activities under the supervision of a board of trustees composed of various cultural institutions such as IRIB and Islamic propaganda organization.”

He writes Tyagi’s The Song of Sparrows has film credits that read like “who’s who of prominent Iranian government institutions.” For example, there is a thank-you to the “Iranian Revolutionary Guards Air Force.”

This was during a time of heightened U.S.-Iran tensions, when Washington had accused Iran of assisting in the killing of five American soldiers based in Iraq, and the then-Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad had repeatedly threatened that the United States, which he declared a “satanic power,” and warned that Israel would disappear from the face of the earth.

Ironic, consider back in 2013, Warren herself claimed banks were laundering money through Iran, as Huff Po reported:

Sen. Elizabeth Warren unloaded on bank regulators Thursday about the fact that British bank HSBC is still doing business in the U.S., with no criminal charges filed against it, despite confessing to what one regulator called “egregious” money laundering violations.

During a Senate Banking Committee hearing about money laundering, Warren (D-Mass.) grilled officials from the Treasury Department, Federal Reserve and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency about why HSBC, which recently paid $1.9 billion to settle money laundering charges, wasn’t criminally prosecuted and shut down in the U.S. Nor were any individuals from HSBC charged with any crimes, despite the bank confessing to laundering billions of dollars for Mexican drug cartels and rogue regimes like Iran and Libya over several years.

Of course this was during the Obama regime, and no way his own DOJ officials were going to look into that, especially since he eventually sent Iran $400 Million.

You Might Like