Trump Directs FBI To Investigate Saudi Nationals Who Mysteriously Disappear While Facing Criminal Charges

 

In a rare instance of constructive bi-partisanship, President Trump is working with far left Senator Ron Wyden to direct the FBI to look into Saudi Arabia’s role in the mysterious disappearances of several Saudi nationals who were facing charges in Oregon, but went missing after Saudi officials posted bail.

These instances were brought to light earlier in the year when The Oregonian ran a feature piece that focused on several of these cases. Each one is strikingly similar; young Saudi college student, arrested for crimes, bailed out by an official from the Saudi consulate, then whisked away never to be seen again.

The cases include Abdulrahman Sameer Noorah, who was facing Manslaughter charges after he ran over a high school girl. An official from the Saudi consulate cut a $100,000 check to bail Noorah out. Noorah was then taken away in a black SUV, and apparently boarded a private jet back to Saudi Arabia.

Abdulaziz Al Duways, a Western Oregon University student, was facing rape and DUI charges. According to the Oregonian article, “Ahmed Alzahrani, of the Saudi Consulate in Los Angeles, posted $50,000 for Al Duways’ release from jail, records show.” Al Duways was never seen again.

Waleed Ali Alharth, an Oregon State University student, was here on a student visa. He was arrested on 10 charges of “Encouraging Child Sex Abuse.” Again, “Faisal Alsudairy, then with the Saudi Consulate in Los Angeles, signed the $50,000 security deposited for Alharthi’s bail, records show.” When Alharth didn’t show up to one of his hearings, The Oregonian continued, “An investigator hired by the Benton County District Attorney’s Office later learned from Transportation Security Administration officials that Alharthi had boarded a plane in Mexico City bound for Paris a week earlier, court records show.”

Ali Hussain Alhamoud, another Oregon State University student, was facing sexual assault charges: “Federal court records in Oregon show the Saudi government bailed out Alhamoud from the Lincoln County Jail after he was indicted on multiple sex crime charges, including first-degree rape…. He boarded a plane in Portland the same day he was released from jail and returned to Saudi Arabia, according to a criminal complaint.”

Also interesting is that the same attorney, Ginger Mooney, represented many of these defendants. She’s now playing the victim card.


Senator Wyden, darling of the far left, has called for investigations into these disappearances. President Trump was also alarmed by these cases. Included in the recent $1.4 Trillion spending package was Wyden’s Saudi Fugitives Declassification Act, which Trump signed.

The Oregonian reported:

President Donald Trump on Friday signed into law a bill that forces U.S. intelligence officials to disclose what they know about the Saudi government’s suspected role in whisking its citizens out of the United States to escape criminal prosecution.

It requires the director of the FBI — in coordination with the nation’s intelligence director — to declassify all information in its possession related to how Saudi Arabia may have helped accused lawbreakers leave the U.S.

“It is long past time to stop treating Saudi Arabia as if it were above the law,” Wyden, a Democrat, said in a statement. “My bill will finally force the federal government to cough up any information it may have about how the Saudi government may have assisted its citizens from fleeing beyond the reach of the U.S. justice system.”

The action in Washington comes nearly a year after an investigation by The Oregonian/OregonLive found multiple cases where Saudi students studying throughout the U.S. vanished while facing sex crime and other felony charges.

The investigation also found similar cases in at least seven other states — Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin — and Canada, bringing the total number of known Saudi suspects who have escaped to 25. Some date back 30 years, suggesting the Saudi government had spent decades helping its citizens flee, subverting the criminal justice system and leaving untold numbers of victims without any recourse.

The United States and Saudi Arabia don’t share an extradition treaty. That makes the return of any Saudi suspect who has left the U.S. unlikely, if not impossible, without diplomatic or political pressure.

In April, a story co-published by The Oregonian/OregonLive and ProPublica showed how the FBI, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and other agencies have been aware of Saudi officials helping their country’s citizens avoid prosecution since at least 2008 yet never intervened.

You Might Like