Comey Defended Stealing Memos on Dinner Meeting with Trump Saying He was acting as “Human Being” — DOJ Gave Him Complete Pass and Refused to Press Charges Anyway

On Thursday the Department of Justice Inspector General released its report on the investigation of fired FBI Director James Comey.

The report concluded: James Comey Violated Department and FBI Policies Pertaining to the Retention, Handling, and Dissemination of FBI Records and Information

The Comey report concluded that fired FBI Director James Comey stole memos and kept them at his home. But FBI officials cleared Comey saying the stolen documents did not contain “classified” material only confidential material.

The agents who categorized the memos were deep state operatives: James Baker, Bill Priestap, and lovers Peter Strzok and Lisa Page.

This is how the Deep State operates.

Comey was also given a pass for this outrageous lie.
The fired FBI Director was asked why he stole memos on his dinner meeting with President Trump in January 2017.

 

Comey told the Inspector General he was meeting with Trump as a friend and “human being” and not as the head of the FBI.

The DOJ IG bought it and gave James Comey a complete pass for lying numerous times.

Being a DC elitist has its perks!

Kim Strassel at the Wall Street Journal reported, via Power Line:

There’s good reason to suspect Mr. Trump was the focus of the bureau’s counterintelligence probe from the start, since that is the only way to explain the FBI’s outrageous decision to hide the probe from the president. The inspector general reports that Mr. Comey’s first briefing of the president-elect, on Jan. 6, 2017, was partly done in the hope that “Trump might make statements about, or provide information of value to,” that probe. That may be the real reason everyone on the FBI leadership team agreed “ahead of time that Comey should memorialize” what happened.

Mr. Horowitz’s report methodically skewers Mr. Comey’s claim that his memos were “personal” and therefore his to keep and use. It notes that he interacted with Mr. Trump only in his capacity as the FBI director, in official settings. He shared the memos with senior FBI leaders. Some memos touch on official investigations, while others contain classified information, which “is never considered personal property.” The report makes clear Mr. Comey knew his claim that the memos were personal was a sham. That characterization, Mr. Horowitz writes, is “wholly incompatible with the plain language of the statutes, regulations, and policies defining Federal records.”

Mr. Comey’s attempt to dig himself out of his disingenuous characterization heightens its absurdity. Asked by the inspector general how a memo describing an official dinner between the FBI director and the president could be considered a “personal” document, Mr. Comey explains that he was also present in his capacity as a “human being.”

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