Chairman Goodlatte Calls on Sessions to Investigate Allegations Obama DOJ Pressured FBI Officials to Shut Down Clinton Foundation Probe

House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte called for Attorney General Jeff Session to investigate allegations Obama’s corrupt DOJ pressured FBI officials to shut down an investigation into the Clinton Foundation during the 2016 presidential election.


House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-VA)

In mid-April, the Office of Inspector General released a scathing report on former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe.

The IG report also presented new evidence Obama’s DOJ sought to shut down the FBI investigation of the Clinton Foundation.

The Wall Street Journal, which is at the center of the accusation against McCabe’s media leaks did previously report that there was an internal struggle between the DOJ leadership and FBI agents investigating the Clinton Foundation.

However, page 5 of the Inspector General report revealed more details of a top DOJ official expressing concerns FBI agents were taking overt steps in the Clinton Foundation investigation during the presidential campaign.

McCabe–PADAG Call on the CF Investigation (August 12)

McCabe told the OIG that on August 12, 2016, he received a telephone call
from PADAG [Principle Associate Deputy Attorney General] regarding the FBI’s handling of the CF Investigation (the “PADAG
call”). McCabe said that PADAG expressed concerns about FBI agents taking overt
steps in the CF Investigation during the presidential campaign. According to
McCabe, he pushed back, asking “are you telling me that I need to shut down a
validly predicated investigation?” McCabe told us that the conversation was “very
dramatic” and he never had a similar confrontation like the PADAG call with a highlevel
Department official in his entire FBI career.

In a letter to Sessions, Chairman Bob Goodlatte calls for an investigation into Obama’s DOJ over this phone call from the PADAC [Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General].


The report states that Mr. McCabe received a phone call from the Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General (PADAG) of the Department of Justice.  As you know, the PADAG is top staff person in the Office of the Deputy Attorney General, who “advises the Deputy Attorney General on all major investigations and policy matters.” The Deputy Attorney General at the time was Sally Yates.  It is unclear based on the IG’s report who was serving as PADAG, but indications are that former PADAG, Matthew Axelrod, was serving in the position at the time.  During the aforementioned phone call, the IG report recounts that the PADAG called Mr. McCabe and “expressed concerns about FBI agents taking overt steps in the CF [Clinton Foundation] Investigation during the presidential campaign.”  This corresponds to reporting by the Wall Street Journal which detailed, “a senior Justice Department official called Mr. McCabe to voice his displeasure at finding that New York FBI agents were still openly pursuing the Clinton Foundation probe during the election season…. The Justice Department official was ‘very pissed off,’ according to one person close to McCabe, and pressed him to explain why the FBI was still chasing a matter the department considered dormant.”

Screenshot of Bob Goodlatte’s letter to AG Sessions via the House Judiciary Committee website:


This would require AG Sessions to take action. Unfortunately as things stand right now it doesn’t look like the ball will move forward on yet another referral from a lawmaker demanding an investigation into Obama’s corruption.

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