Meet Mueller’s “Shadowy” Witness — A Convicted Child Molester & Globe-Trotting “Fixer”

Special Counsel Robert Mueller is currently investigating whether George Nader, an advisor to the United Arab Emirates, is influencing U.S. policy, the New York Times reported on March 3rd. A new report by the AP shines light on the “shadowy,” past of Nader, who is known as a globe-trotting “fixer,” who once had an alleged appetite for minors. 

Below is a photo of Mr. Nader.

AP reports:

How did George Nader — Lebanese-American businessman, globe-trotting “fixer,” convicted child molester — get caught up in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation?

Nader is little known to the public, a man who has led a shadowy existence as a go-between across numerous Middle East capitals and who gave testimony to Mueller’s Washington grand jury earlier this month. […]

Nader joined a meeting at New York’s Trump Tower in December 2016 that brought together presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner, chief strategist Steve Bannon — fired by Trump last August — and Mohammed bin Zayed, crown prince of Abu Dhabi and de facto leader of the United Arab Emirates. A second meeting occurred a month later in the Indian Ocean archipelago of Seychelles and involved Nader, bin Zayed, former Blackwater boss Erik Prince and Kirill Dmitriev, a Russian banker close to President Vladimir Putin. […]

A George Nader was convicted by Prague’s Municipal Court of 10 cases of sexually abusing minors and sentenced to a one-year prison term in May 2003, court spokeswoman Marketa Puci told The Associated Press on Wednesday. She said the crimes occurred between 1999 and 2002. She said Nader served time in a Prague prison, though it isn’t clear how much. He was then ordered expelled.

As previously reported by The Gateway Pundit, Mueller has crossed President Trump’s “red line” after issuing a subpoena for documents related to the Trump Organization’s business dealings with Russia.

New York Times reports:


The special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, has subpoenaed the Trump Organization to turn over documents, including some related to Russia, according to two people briefed on the matter. The order is the first known time that the special counsel demanded documents directly related to President Trump’s businesses, bringing the investigation closer to the president. […]

The Trump Organization has said that it never had real estate holdings in Russia, but witnesses recently interviewed by Mr. Mueller have been asked about a possible real estate deal in Moscow. In 2015, a longtime business associate of Mr. Trump’s emailed Mr. Trump’s lawyer Michael Cohen at his Trump Organization account claiming he had ties to President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia and said that building a Trump Tower in Moscow would help Mr. Trump’s presidential campaign.

Recently, Mueller’s Russia probe took yet another unpredictable turn after the special counsel invoked the unusual “conspiracy to defraud the government,” charge that “could use the same legal strategy to go after President Trump and his associates, even if the conspiracy is not linked to a criminal act,” The Washington Times reports.

Emma Kohse, Harvard International Law Journal editor-in-chief, Benjamin Wittes, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and the Lawfare blog’s top editor, argue that, based in the language of the indictments and the legal precedents behind them, the “conspiracy to defraud the government” charge provides the Mueller team with significant flexibility in trying to build a case against Mr. Trump and members of his 2016 campaign. […]

“Russia’s sustained, many-front effort to interfere in the 2016 election — a glimpse of which was shown in the indictment — is undoubtedly more complex and far-reaching than the plots that have previously been prosecuted as conspiracies to defraud the United States,” Ms. Kohse and Mr. Wittes write. “But that makes Mueller’s theory richer, not more novel.”

President Trump’s lawyers are in the process of negotiating with special counsel Robert Mueller to bring the Russia probe to an end, reports Rebecca Ballhaus and Peter Nicholas of the Wall Street Journal.

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