#Vault7: WikiLeaks Dumps Documents Detailing CIA Tool Allowing Control of Webcams

WikiLeaks has once again “downloaded” on the CIA. This time, the ‘Leak Machine,’ that is Julian Assange and co., have released documents detailing how America’s top spies use a tool called ‘Dumbo’ to take over webcams. 

Sputnik News reports:

“Dumbo is a capability to suspend processes utilizing webcams and corrupt any video recordings that could compromise a PAG deployment. The PAG (Physical Access Group) is a special branch within the CCI (Center for Cyber Intelligence); its task is to gain and exploit physical access to target computers in CIA field operations,” WikiLeaks said in a press release.

The tool allows for the identification, control and manipulation of the monitoring and detection systems, like webcams and microphones, on a target computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. It requires a direct access to the computer as it is run from an USB stick.

“All processes related to the detected devices (usually recording, monitoring or detection of video/audio/network streams) are also identified and can be stopped by the operator. By deleting or manipulating recordings the operator is aided in creating fake or destroying actual evidence of the intrusion operation,” the press release specified.

As The Gateway Pundit reported on Monday morning, WikiLeaks released thousands of emails related to Emmanuel Macron’s presidential campaign in France. 

Daily Caller reports:

The release comes almost three months after Macron’s campaign was hacked two days before his election. The site released more than 71,000 emails — 21,075 of which have been verified through “domain keys,” the organization said in a statement. The documents range between March 2009 and April 24, 2017.

Macron’s campaign issued a statement May 5 saying a major hack had put thousands of emails and internal communication at risk. The hack did not reveal any smoking guns and Macron went on to beat populist Marine Le Pen in a landslide vote two days later.

An investigation into the hack concluded that it was the result of “an isolated incident” that could have been carried out by anyone.

“The attack was so generic and simple that it could have been practically anyone,” Guillaume Poupard, the head of France’s cyber security agency Anssi, told the Associated Press June 1.

This is not the first time Macron’s campaign emails have been released. Days before the election, thousands of emails related to the campaign were released. Due to French law, local media was banned from reporting on the contents of the emails.

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