Notre Dame President Not Sure About Inviting Trump to Speak – But Invited Pro-Abortion Obama to Speak Twice

Notre Dame President Father Jenkins told reporters in January 2010 that the decision to host Barack Obama, the most radical pro-abortion president in history, at commencement in 2009 was an honor and a success.

(America Magazine)

Obama even supported infanticide while serving as a lawmaker in Illinois.  Despite this, Notre Dame University invited him to come back and speak on campus again in 2012.

But this year Fr. Jenkins is not sure if he will invite Republican president-elect Donald Trump to speak at commencement.
He says Trump may be too divisive.
The NDSM Observer reported:

The country is starting to look forward and examine the implications of Donald Trump’s victory — and for University President Fr. John Jenkins, that means pondering what the election means for Notre Dame.

In an interview with The Observer on Thursday, Jenkins said he is considering inviting the President-elect to speak at this year’s Commencement ceremony.

“I do think the elected leader of the nation should be listened to. And it would be good to have that person on the campus — whoever they are, whatever their views,” he said. “At the same time, the 2009 Commencement was a bit of a political circus, and I think I’m conscious that that day is for graduates and their parents — and I don’t want to make the focus something else.”

Traditionally, the University has invited presidents to speak at graduation during their first year in White House. In 2009, President Barack Obama was the sixth president to deliver the Commencement address, following in the steps of Dwight Eisenhower, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush.

Jenkins said he plans to select a Commencement speaker sometime during the spring semester. Right now, he’s still weighing the different factors involved.

“My concern a little bit is that, should the new president come, it may be even more of a circus,” he said.

This election spurred levels political acrimony higher than Jenkins said he remembers in the past.

“I think it’s fair to say the election reveals deep divides in this nation — divides on political views, on economic prospects, educational differences, differences in opportunities,” he said. “And they run deep in the country.”…

…In a prayer service hosted six days after the election, Jenkins told undocumented students that the University would continue to support them, even if Trump were to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program, as he promised to do during his campaign.

The DACA Program was the result of an executive order issued by Obama and allows some undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children to gain work authorization and, in many cases, financial aid to attend universities. Last week, Jenkins signed a public statement in support of DACA, joining more than 400 other college and university presidents.

“These people were brought here as minors and are highly talented people, are valuable to this country,” Jenkins said. “So, if an administration would make changes, I would think trying to deport these talented young people would be among the most ill-advised moves they could make.”

“If there should be an effort to do that, we would do everything we can to fight that, whatever way we can,” he added. “Not only for these young people who are Notre Dame students, but for the good of the nation.”

In the past, the University has refused to give information on the immigration status of its students when asked by the state of Indiana.

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