Guest post by Kristinn Taylor

Leave it to the liberals at the Smithsonian to bungle what should have been a strictly fun exhibition of American coolness.

Berlin, Erich Honecker empfängt Angela Davis
Angela Davis meets in East Germany with communist leader Erich Honecker, Sept. 11, 1972. Photo by Peter Koard via Wikipedia commons.

A new exhibit debuting this week at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. features photographs of the one hundred coolest Americans under the title “American Cool.”

Someone forgot to tell the Smithsonian that commies aren’t cool. And that Canadians aren’t Americans.

Included in the list of artistic, literary, film, music, sports, business, and political American icons such as Andy Warhol, , Raymond Chandler, John Wayne, Hank Williams, Jim Brown, Steve Jobs, and Frederick Douglass are Canadian citizen Neil Young and notorious communist Angela Davis.

While some others on the list, like Dorothy Parker, had communist backgrounds, they were not famous for that. They were famous for their talent. Davis’ sole talent was being a communist revolutionary with a giant Afro.

Canadian Neil Young has lived in the United States for decades, he has retained his Canadian citizenship and has been honored by the Canadian government in recent years.

Angela Davis became well known when she fled prosecution after her guns were used in a dramatic courtroom uprising in California where a judge and jurors were taken hostage (the judge was killed.)

Davis was eventually captured and put on trial. She was acquitted by a sympathetic jury.

Discover the Networks has the details:

“In 1968, as Soviet tanks rolled into Czechoslovakia to crush the “Prague spring,” Davis joined the Communist Party, voicing her belief that “the only path of liberation for black people is that which leads toward complete and radical overthrow of the capitalist class.”

“In September 1969 Davis was fired from UCLA when her membership in the Communist Party became known. This resulted in a celebrated First Amendment battle that made Davis a national figure and forced UCLA to rehire her.

“In 1970 Davis was implicated by more than 20 witnesses in a plot to free her imprisoned lover, fellow Black Panther George Jackson, by hijacking a Marin County, California courtroom and taking hostage the judge, the prosecuting assistant district attorney, and two jurors. In an ensuing gun battle outside the court building, Judge Harold Haley’s head was blown off by a sawed-off shotgun owned by Ms. Davis. To avoid arrest for her alleged complicity in the plot, Ms. Davis fled California, using aliases and changing her appearance to avoid detection.

“Two months later Davis was arrested by the FBI in New York City. At her 1972 trial, Davis presented her version of where she had been and what she had been doing at the time of the shootout. Because she was acting as her own attorney, she could not be cross-examined. She presented a number of alibi witnesses, almost all Communist friends, who testified that she had been with them in Los Angeles playing Scrabble at the time of the Marin slaughter. Prosecution witnesses who placed her in Marin were dismissed by Davis and her fellow attorneys as being unable to accurately identify blacks — because they were white.

“Following the announcement of the verdict that acquitted Davis, one juror faced news cameras and gave a revolutionary’s clenched-fist salute. He laughed at the justice system, saying that prosecutors had been mistaken to expect that the “middle-class jury” would convict Davis. He and most of the jurors then went off to partake in a Davis victory party.”

And, today this communist revolutionary is being honored by the Smithsonian.

 

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