Hero Charles G. Koch: Despite Being Villified We Will Continue to Speak Out for Freedom & American Values

Despite the constant attacks by leftists and socialists, capitalist Charles G. Koch wrote today that he will not be intimidated and will continue to support pro-American politicians and candidates.

The left has demonized the Koch brothers since Barack Obama singled out one of their organizations in an August speech.
Here’s one of the disgusting signs at a MoveOn.org protest last weekend in Jefferson City.

Nice.

Charles Koch vowed to keep contributing and standing up for conservative politicians, like Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.
The Wall Street Journal reported:

Years of tremendous overspending by federal, state and local governments have brought us face-to-face with an economic crisis. Federal spending will total at least $3.8 trillion this year—double what it was 10 years ago. And unlike in 2001, when there was a small federal surplus, this year’s projected budget deficit is more than $1.6 trillion.

Several trillions more in debt have been accumulated by state and local governments. States are looking at a combined total of more than $130 billion in budget shortfalls this year. Next year, they will be in even worse shape as most so-called stimulus payments end.

For many years, I, my family and our company have contributed to a variety of intellectual and political causes working to solve these problems. Because of our activism, we’ve been vilified by various groups. Despite this criticism, we’re determined to keep contributing and standing up for those politicians, like Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who are taking these challenges seriously.

Both Democrats and Republicans have done a poor job of managing our finances. They’ve raised debt ceilings, floated bond issues, and delayed tough decisions.

In spite of looming bankruptcy, President Obama and many in Congress have tiptoed around the issue of overspending by suggesting relatively minor cuts in mostly discretionary items. There have been few serious proposals for necessary cuts in military and entitlement programs, even though these account for about three-fourths of all federal spending.

Yes, some House leaders have suggested cutting spending to 2008 levels. But getting back to a balanced budget would mean a return to at least 2003 spending levels—and would still leave us with the problem of paying off our enormous debts.

read the whole thing.

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