Peggy Was Wrong… Obama Didn’t Pay For Our Gas – He Doubled the Price

Worst. President. Ever.
If only Peggy would have been right. If only Barack Obama would pay our gas bill.
Then everything would be OK.

Unfortunately, it didn’t happen. Instead, gas prices doubled.
The Washington Times reported:

Feeling pain at the pump? Gas prices have doubled since Mr. Obama took office. According to the GasBuddy gasoline price tracking web site, the price of a gallon of regular gas was around $1.79 when Mr. Obama took office. Today the national average is $3.58. The lowest average price in the continental United States is $3.31 in Tulsa Oklahoma, the highest is $4.14 in Santa Barbara, CA. Four-dollar-a-gallon gas has arrived on average throughout California, and a number of other states are headed in that direction.

Eric Milito at the American Petroleum Industry blogged yesterday on the Obama administration’s failed attempts to address our nation’s energy security.

What Americans want is less political rhetoric – and more honest efforts to address the realities of our nation’s energy security, today and in the decades before us.

What Americans want is political leadership about meeting the energy needs of America’s families and America’s businesses…

…In the last two weeks, the administration has delayed an important infrastructure investment that would bring more Canadian oil to the United States – and with it thousands of U.S. jobs.

President Obama traveled to Brazil, where he touted the benefits of Brazilian oil, produced by Brazilian workers.

And yesterday, the president’s point person on oil and natural gas development, Secretary Salazar, released a politically motivated and deeply flawed report regarding so-called idle leases.

Among other things, it lists offshore leases that do not yet have approved exploration or development plans as “inactive,” regardless of whether there is exploration and pre-production activity going on: such as seismic or technical reviews of the geography…

…The disturbing reality is that 2011 could go down as the first year since 1957 that there has not been at least one offshore lease sale. Not one.

I’m certain that Americans find it difficult to reconcile that – and the fact that 85 percent of our offshore resources are off-limits to development – despite increased uncertainty in world oil markets and rising worldwide demand for crude oil.

Comments