30% of Iraqis Return Home

The following is a Haider Ajina translation of a headline and article from the Iraqi news agency of Buratha on September 7, 2006.

“30% of Iraqi displaced return to their homes”

The speaker of the ministry of displaced and immigrants Mahdi Alhaidery said; “Last month about 30% of families displaced or forced to move have returned to their original homes all over Iraq.” Alhaidery added in a press conference; “Indications show that displacements of families which started after the attacks on Askariah Shrine in Samarah last February have abated. The abatement is largely due to the efforts of tribal leaders, positive development from the national unity and reconciliation program and the reinforcement of Iraqi security in restive areas.”

Haider Ajina comments:

The reported forced migration or displacement, (which by the way in a survey, covering all 18 Iraqi provinces, in mid June 2006 only 20% of those surveyed personally knew some one who was displaced) was widely covered by most main media.

Now that one third of those displaced have returned over last month, and the return continues this month we do not hear much about it. The survey I refer to also shows an interesting result. If only 20% of those surveyed in 18 provinces know some one displaced, why do we have the impression from the news that every one should know someone who has been displaced? The answer is this. As I dwelled deeper into the demographics of the survey I found that this 20% who knew some one displaced were concentrated in Baghdad and the Sunni area just north of Baghdad. These areas are restive and experiencing over 85% of the violence in Iraq. These are also the areas where the terrorists are concentrating their fighting because this is where they get the most media coverage, and it makes it seam like all of Iraq is fighting.

This same survey also indicated that 60% of those surveyed felt that things will be better in five years, 54% of those surveyed approved of Al Maliki’s government. To the question “How would you describe security conditions in your neighborhood?” the answers were as follows: 18% excellent, 22% good, 20% fair that is a total of 60% with positive indications of the security in their neighborhoods.

Regards,
Haider Ajina

And… Back Talk today takes a look at the positive results from another Iraqi poll.

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